The Piña Brothers

Larry Piña
Managing Partner
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John Piña
Partner
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Ranndy Piña
Partner
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Davie Piña
Partner
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The Piña Staff

Anna Monticelli image Anna Monticelli
Winemaker
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Macario Montoya image Macario Montoya
Assistant Winemaker
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Denise Moffit, sales manager  image Leslie Burma
Wine Educator
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Tom Shirmang image Ross Workman
Wine Educator
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Clair Palmer image Clair Palmer
Wine Educator
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Pina Brothers on their tractor

PIÑA NAPA VALLEY: Our History

The Piña name (it means “fruit of the pine” in Spanish)

The Piña Brothers family’s paternal history includes grandparents who left Malaga, Spain in 1911 to work in Hawaii for promises of gold and land and subsequently came to California where they settled on a farm in Rutherford in the 1920s.The grandfather of the current generation of Piñas owned a vineyard on the Silverado Trail near the Piña Napa Valley winery.

The Piña Brothers family’s maternal side of the family has been making its home in the Napa Valley since 1856 when their progenitor Bluford Stice led a wagon train into the valley from Missouri. The Piñas’ great-great-grandfather Bluford Stice’s son Lafayette was a farmer and winemaker, owning vineyards where Stice Lane is today, just south of St. Helena; he was a leader in the wine industry of Napa Valley at the turn of the twentieth century as the winemaker at Inglenook Winery.

The Piñas’ great-grandfather Charles Glos homesteaded on Howell Mountain in the 1880s, almost in sight of the Buckeye Vineyard: their children literally walked 6 miles to school in St. Helena. Charles’s son Charles married Mabel Stice, Lafayette’s daughter and settled in Rutherford owning vineyards where Glos Lane is today.

Their father was the vineyard manager for a property which are today the Plump Jack and Rudd properties. On the side, he had clients for whom he managed their vineyards and by 1960 he went out on his own, opening John Piña Jr. & Sons. At that time vineyard and winery owners wanted ‘clean’ fruit which met primarily only the Brix requirements of a given winery. You grew as many grapes as you could, getting them as ripe as possible. This approach held true through the 1960s, where reps from wineries would only appear at harvest time and not visit the vineyards during the rest of the year. By the early 1970s the wineries became more involved and their requirements became more complex; by the late 1970s, the Piñas saw big-winery winemakers visiting their vineyards quarterly and today the family now participates with these winemakers in making all the important viticultural decisions throughout the growing season. They have seen the parameters for grapes become much more stringent and much less quantity-oriented. The grapes the family has farmed have changed in these decades also—in the 1960s they were farming Alicante, Petite Syrah, Palomino, Chenin Blanc, Sauvignon Vert, which are seldom seen today. Fundamentally the Piñas now are masters of a huge universe of complex variables--- soil, rootstock, clones, trellises, water and more. Today they can use infrared photography to analyze whether a cover crop should be disked, for example. They have demonstrated their leadership as viticulturalists and now have extended that expertise to their own small portfolio of single-vineyard wines from their own vineyards.

The Piña name is more familiar as “Piña Vineyard Management” one of the most respected vineyard management companies in the Napa Valley.

Link to PVM website